Exploring

the Dimensional Gap

Photography is a constant source of fascination and revelation for me to see the world in a myriad ways. Beyond all the theoretical concepts of photo-taking, what intrigues me most is the sensorial jolt of capturing an unspoken story; a teasing glimpse of a window of opportunity to engage in another lived experience; or simply sheer luck for landing in the crossroads of the right moment in the right place. The potential of preserving an ephemeral moment in time is compelling.

Yet, I sometimes feel that the actuality of capturing a three-dimensional realm within a two dimensional medium can fall flat – quite literally.

How might we capture and preserve the multi-dimensional qualities of a photographic subject?

Exploring

the Dimensional Gap

Photography is a constant source of fascination and revelation for me to see the world in a myriad ways. Beyond all the theoretical concepts of photo-taking, what intrigues me most is the sensorial jolt of capturing an unspoken story; a teasing glimpse of a window of opportunity to engage in another lived experience; or simply sheer luck for landing in the crossroads of the right moment in the right place. The potential of preserving an ephemeral moment in time is compelling.

Yet, I sometimes feel that the actuality of capturing a three-dimensional realm within a two dimensional medium can fall flat – quite literally.

How might we capture and preserve the multi-dimensional qualities of a photographic subject?

THE PROTOTYPE

Application Scenario:  3-Dimensional Interactive Content, EXD Lab 2020 

THE MAKING

Observation

While I was researching and experimenting how to best capture and preserve three-dimensional objects, I stumbled across a statue of a historical figure at a museum courtyard. After reading an inscription about the accomplishments of Jawaharlal Nehru, one of the great leaders of South Asia, an opportunity to present a multi-dimensional story sprung forth.

Mesh form

Solid form

Textured form

Digitalisation

The captured 3D model consists of a point cloud of geometric samples on the surface of the subject. These points are used to extrapolate the shape of the item through a reconstruction process.

Mapping Process

360o Preview

Redefining the new forms

Once digitalised, the collected 3D data can be useful for a variety of applications. Common uses of this technology include: 3D printing, virtual/augmented reality, motion capture, gesture recognition, robotic mapping, industrial design, orthotics and prosthetics, reverse engineering, prototyping, quality control/inspection and the digitisation of cultural artefacts, and many more.

Application Scenario: Restoration Simulation 

The future is virtual

While the nature of humans yearns for the tangible, that of the biologically-physical (at least for now) form, virtualisation has opened up new dimensional layers. Digital copies/representations can now be preserved, studied, explored and further developed for meaningful impact, longevity, and history, thus closing the dimensional gap to understand our world better and differently, beyond the stand-still ephemeral moments of a photograph.

We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we can have if only we seek them with our eyes open.

Jawaharlal Nehru

EXD Lab Pte Ltd © 2020

Leave a Reply